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Driving T-junction
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What is a T-Junction

How to tackle T-junctions When you’re learning to drive, one of the things you’ll inevitably have to tackle is a T-junction. They can be a little intimidating when you’re starting out on your journey. Not to worry, we’re going to run through…

Simon Jones
by Simon Jones

How to tackle T-junctions


When you’re learning to drive, one of the things you’ll inevitably have to tackle is a T-junction. They can be a little intimidating when you’re starting out on your journey. Not to worry, we’re going to run through how to recognise the T-junction sign and how to emerge safely at a T-junction.

What are T-junctions used for?

T-junctions are used where a minor road joins a major road. That’s why they’re called T-junctions, driving up the minor road is the vertical line, and the top of the ‘T’ is the major road.

T-junction sign

The first step to nailing T-junctions is being able to recognise the T-junction sign. Knowing your T-junction road sign will help you get prepared so you can approach the junction safely.

T-Junction sign, learner driver insurance, temporary car insurance, short term cover

The T junction sign is a red triangle because it’s a road sign that’s warning you of an upcoming hazard. The right of way is shown by the direction the thicker line is pointing in.

Mirror signal manoeuvre.
 
When you’re dealing with T-junctions, using your mirror signal manoeuvre routine is essential. Observation at junctions is the most common driving test fault. The best way to avoid this mistake is to practice and make sure your observations become habit.
 
A bit of exaggeration with your mirror checks on driving test day won’t hurt either. An extra tilt of the head towards the mirror will make sure your instructor doesn’t miss your observations!

You’ll need to be able to show your driving instructor you can pull out safely.
  1. Check your mirrors and your blind spots
  2. Signal with plenty of time before you get to the junction
  3. Get in the correct position on the road
  4. Slow down as you approach the junction and get into the right gear
  5. Observation at the junction – make sure the road is clear
  6. Move swiftly once you’re sure it’s safe for you to go

How to emerge at different types of T-junctions

As you approach the T-junction, you’ll need to figure out whether it’s an open or a closed junction.

Closed junctions

Closed junctions are junctions where the view of the road ahead is obscured by something; whether it be trees, bushes or houses. At closed junctions, you’re likely to have to come to a complete stop before moving off.

At some closed junctions, there may even be a stop sign. If there’s a stop sign, by law you’ve got to come to a complete stop. You can’t just slow down, you’ll need to come to a total stop before moving off in first gear.

As you pull out, you’ll have to emerge slowly. It’s often referred to in driving as the ‘peep and creep’. It sounds a bit funny, but it just means you move out slowly while constantly checking the road and your blind spots. Check carefully and once it’s safe, move out to the road ahead of you.

Open junctions

Open junctions are where the view of the road ahead is clear. In this situation, where there’s nothing obscuring the view, it’s generally safe for you to move onto the road ahead without stopping.
 
However, it’s important to approach the junction slowly. Generally, second gear is the most appropriate gear to drive in when you’re approaching an open junction.
 
Once you’re certain it’s safe to pull out onto the road, it’s important to move fairly quickly. You should be able to pull out onto the road, without causing any of the oncoming traffic to slow down or change their route.

Learning to drive?

If you’re learning to drive, you might find it helpful to practice driving at T-junctions outside of your driving lessons. With our learner driver insurance, you could practice with a friend or family member. It’s totally flexible and you could be on the road in minutes.
Simon Jones
Simon Jones

Worked for short-term car insurance provider Veygo for over 3 years. Been involved in building insurance products for learner drivers and people looking for temporary cover on cars. The telling the world about them through marketing campaigns. Also drive a bit myself, mainly my son around where ever he needs to go.

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